Tag: problem-solving

27
May

Think Like A Freaky Tourist

Think Like A FreakA few nights ago, we enjoyed taking in the new Freakonomics book with authors Steven Levit and Stephen Dubner.  The latest incarnation of their Freaky franchise, Think Like a Freak debuts this week at #2 on the New York Times bestseller list. For us in the creative industries, the popularity of thinking differently is a welcome addition to our thinking toolkit.

With their usual witticism and insight, Levit and Dubner offer more observations into the ways we rely on habits and unconscious incentives when making decisions and solving problems. Often we don’t critically think through our own thinking process, say Levit and Dubner. We don’t recognize our selfish motives when thinking and taking action; we shy away from asking for help and we stand on the shoulders of conventional wisdom to solve problems.

As we continue our Think Like A Tourist series, I want to bring an older voice into our ongoing conversation about creativity, Mr. George Orwell.

Orwell was a writer obsessed with clear thinking and writing. In his famous essay Politics and the English Language, Orwell took issue with jargon and complex writing styles. He disliked glossy or shimmery writing, because as he saw it, such writing lacked lucid thinking. In Politics and the English Language, he pressed writers to write less and think more. He wanted writers as artists to take a step outside their craft and evaluate how they make art. In this way, Orwell wasn’t necessarily interested in helping writers become great writers so much as he wanted writers and artists to be rigorous thinkers. As he rightly saw it, writers and artists have responsibilities to their craft and audiences. Readers need to read something that challenges their habits and stretches their ways of looking at the world. He wanted audiences and writers to use their minds and exceed each other’s expectations.

Orwell’s aspirations are applicable for us in the creative industries. Our work lives are framed by trends, reports, data, thought leadership, research findings, insights and even the five-paragraph executive summary. These pieces of conventional wisdom are the beacons of our craft, giving direction to our solutions and shaping the direction for our clients’ next launch.

More than thinking like a freak, Orwell reminds us to always take a few steps back before we write, draw and do. Pay attention to the words we use, the phrases we toss about in meetings, and the goals we give our teams.

Who feeds you the language, phrases, terms and conventional wisdom everyday?

 

27
Sep

Think Like A Tourist Series: Think Like A Kid

Greg Heffron_2 Scott Rothstein_2

 

If you’re working in the creative services industry (or any creative field, for that matter), generating innovative ideas or strategies is what you do everyday, on multiple occasions.  Bosses, clients and colleagues depend on your ability to galvanize your forces — wit, tenacity, optimism and grit — as you generate bursts of ideas, thoughts, emotions and, ultimately, solutions. What’s your process for brainstorming? How do you prepare your mind for the serious work of creativity?

In our ongoing series, “Think Like A Tourist,” we know creativity and problem-solving require more than showing up to meet with others. Brainstorming actually requires prepping your mind for brainstorming, and putting yourself in the position to let your ideas flow effortlessly. And flow they will, but you have to know the steps.  At Oishii, we like our teammates to “think like a kid” before some of our meetings.  No, we don’t mean come in ready to play, but rather, put your mind in a playful space, where the world is infinite, options are everywhere and your purpose is to have fun. This is what we mean by taking a kid-like approach to the creative task ahead of you.

So put your “kid thinking” cap on and see how your next brainstorming session goes. We’d love to hear about your experience!


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